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Casino's Fate Lies In Voters' Hands

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Voters today in Maryland's Anne Arundel County will determine whether the state's largest slots casino will be built at Arundel Mills Mall.

Baltimore-based Cordish Company is looking to build the casino at the mall. Company President Joe Weinberg says they chose the mall site over Laurel Park Racecourse for a number of reasons.

"There are less residents who live around Arundel Mills than any commercial site in Anne Arundel County, including Laurel. Laurel has three times the residential population as lives around Arundel Mills," Weinberg says.

Some nearby residents partnered with the Maryland Jockey Club to fight the project and to get the casino built at the race track. Tom Chuckas, the president of the jockey club, says a casino was always meant for Laurel Park.

"Laurel Park's been here for over 100 years. The surrounding community has developed over that period of time knowing full well there was racing and gaming at this location. Laurel Park is created to handle 20- to 25,000 people," Chuckas says.

The campaign has turned personal over the past month, with both sides accusing the other of misleading voters and being disingenuous.

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