: News

Va. House Races Could Provide 'Early Signs' Of National Outcome

Play associated audio

Democrats and Republicans are watching a handful of Virginia House contests for indications of how they will fare in Tuesday's elections.

Democrats currently hold six of Virginia's 11 House seats. David Wasserman has been tracking the races for the Cook Political Report. He says these House contests will provide an early barometer if there's a national political wave for the GOP.

"Well we political junkies are fortunate that Virginia will give us some early signs as to which way election night is headed," Wasserman says. "There are four Democratic seats that are at some risk in Virginia. There are two that Republicans ought to win if they are going to take back control of the House."

Polls show one of the closest races is in Northern Virginia's 11th district where first term Democrat Gerry Connolly is trying to stave off a challenge from Republican Keith Fimian. The other two most hotly contested races are in Southeastern Virginia, where incumbent Democrats Tom Perriello and Glenn Nye are facing Republican challengers Robert Hurt and Scott Rigell.

NBC4 video on Virginia's 11th District:

View more news videos at: http://www.nbcwashington.com/video.

NPR

Not My Job: We Quiz Lena Headey On Games Worse Than 'Game Of Thrones'

Game of Thrones may have killed off many major characters, but the manipulative, scheming Queen Cersei is still standing. We've invited Headey to play a game called "You win and you die."
NPR

After Introducing Changes, Keurig Sales Continue To Fall

Despite America's high coffee consumption, Keurig reported disappointing sales this week. Even during its popular holiday selling period, the numbers haven't perked up in recent years.
NPR

Do Political TV Ads Still Work?

TV ads are a tried-and-true way for politicians to get their message out. But in this chaotic presidential primary, are they still effective?
NPR

Twitter Says It Has Shut Down 125,000 Terrorism-Related Accounts

The announcement comes just weeks after a woman sued Twitter, saying the platform knowingly let ISIS use the network "to spread propaganda, raise money and attract recruits."

Leave a Comment

Help keep the conversation civil. Please refer to our Terms of Use and Code of Conduct before posting your comments.