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Defense Tries To Define Levy's Relationship With Former Congressman

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Former California Congressman Gary Condit took the witness stand today in the Chandra Levy murder trial.

It was Condit's relationship with the former intern which helped elevate the national discussion around her murder. Today, the defense attorney for Ingmar Guandique--the man accused of killing Levy--tried to define that relationship.

During direct questioning from prosecutor Amanda Haines, Condit told jurors he did not murder Levy and insisted he cooperated fully with investigators eight years ago. When asked why he never acknowledged an affair with Levy, Condit told Haines it was a matter of principle.

"I think we're all entitled to a level of privacy," Condit said.

Later on cross examination, defense attorney Mario Hawilo was more direct, asking Condit if he ever had an intimate relationship with Levy. Condit refused to answer, saying, "I am not going to respond to personal or private questions."

Hawilo persisted with additional questions about the nature of the relationship until Superior Court Judge Gerald Fisher called the attorneys to his bench and told Hawilo to end questioning on the subject.

Condit ended testimony shortly after 3 p.m. The trial continues tomorrow in D.C. Superior Court.

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