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Art Beat: Monday, Nov. 1

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"Art Beat" with Sabri Ben-Achour:

(Nov. 1) FRIGHTENED RABBIT Halloween is over, but one band of bunnies is still frightened. Frightened Rabbit is a band, based in Glasgow some treats tonight. The Glasow based musicians sing quaint pop songs about love and lesser feelings at the 9:30 Club in Northwest Washington.

(Nov. 1-Nov. 28) SUPERFLEX Danish art collective Superflex is interested in the microcosms of capitalist societies. A past exhibit involved disorienting customers at convenience stores by giving everything away for free. Their latest is Flooded McDonald’s, a film project that depicts an inundated, meticulously recreated McDonald’s restaurant. It’s open through November 28 at Washington’s Hirshhorn Museum.

(Nov. 1-Jan. 30) THE CIRCLE OF LIFE (IT MOVES US ALL) As creatures of the 21st century, it’s easy to forget that photography put a couple painters out of work some years ago. Painters turned to ambiguous depictions of reality, which in turn influenced photography. The dialogue between the two is the stuff of The Pre-Raphaelite Lens: British Photography and Painting, 1848-1875 showing through late January at the National Gallery of Art on the National Mall.

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