: News

Filed Under:

Latest Maryland Regional News

Play associated audio

WASHINGTON (AP) The government reports its first estimate of the third quarter gross domestic product today. Economists predict it will show the economy grew at a 2 percent annual rate from July to September. President Barack Obama is expected to discuss the economy at campaign stops in Maryland and Virginia today.

ROCKVILLE, Md. (AP) A Vermont man has been arrested in Montgomery County on charges that he sexually abused a girl in her home from 1999 to 2001. Police say the victim was a 10-year-old student of Fernando Asturizaga's at a private school in Prince George's County.

ROCKVILLE, Md. (AP) The National Archives says it's cooperating with a theft investigation involving a retired employee. The search of longtime Archives employee Leslie Waffen's home came as two government audits found problems with the Archives' record management and security.

BALTIMORE (AP) A 47-year-old Baltimore man is accused of impersonating a police officer in order to molest a 14-year-old boy. Police are concerned there may be other victims, in part because Mark Citro volunteered at a school near his home.

(Copyright 2010 by The Associated Press. All Rights Reserved.)

NPR

Pack These Pages: Three Must-Reads For Summer

Harriet Logan, owner of Loganberry Books in Shaker Heights, Ohio, recommends a graphic novel about trash, a George Eliot classic and a children's book about a bear pianist.
NPR

Why Does Every New Restaurant Look Like A Factory?

The stripped-down look of exposed brick, poured cement floors, and Edison light bulbs is popular in restaurants across America. One reporter dares to ask, "Seriously, why?"
WAMU 88.5

Why Local Nonprofits Haven't Fixed Poverty

As long as there has been poverty, there have been people trying to end it. We explore the obstacles and inefficiencies local nonprofits run into when trying to solve society's stubborn problem.

WAMU 88.5

Can We Trust Our Cars?

There were more airbag recalls this week, and VW has agreed to pay nearly fifteen billion in its emissions cheating scandal. Meanwhile, cars with driverless technology are becoming available, but whether they will make us safer is up for debate. A look at auto safety and consumer trust.

Leave a Comment

Help keep the conversation civil. Please refer to our Terms of Use and Code of Conduct before posting your comments.