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Crime Victims Ask Police To Be Thorough

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In Maryland, law enforcement spent an evening in Silver Spring listening to crime victims and their families.

Michael and Gaile Seaton's daughter, Stacy, was found dead in a Bowie park in 2005. She was just 18. Their memories of that day are crystal-clear, and not just because it was the day they lost their daughter. It was also the way police handled her murder. Michael Seaton says initially, officers said Stacy Seaton died from hitting her head because of a drug overdose.

"They said it's because she's pale. And my wife said she always pale. My wife has skin cancer and so my daughter stayed out of the sun intentionally. That's how they were basing it," Michael Seaton says.

After Stacy Seaton was pronounced dead, her mother was not allowed to see her at the hospital. After forcing her way in, Gaile Seaton saw blood coming from her daughter's head. She eventually implored a nurse to call for X-rays, which showed that her daughter had been shot in the head.

Michael Seaton said by then, the police were way behind in finding his daughter's killer.

"So the whole time, the crime scene is left unattended. Now, you're having to change midstream on how you're thinking about everything from a suicide or a drug overdose to murder," he says.

The Seatons are asking law enforcement, in particular first responders, to be more thorough. An arrest was made in their daughter's murder more than four years later. The suspect faces trial in January.

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