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Art Beat: Tuesday, Oct. 26

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Art Beat with Sabri Ben-Achour:

(Oct. 26-April 2011) 1000 YEARS OF KINGS If you’re up for something epic this week, try Shahnama: 1000 Years of the Persian Book of Kings. Smithsonian’s Sackler Gallery presents 33 exquisitely detailed paintings of kings, heroes, and mythological creatures from the Shahmana, a 100,000 line Iranian poem considered one of the world’s great literary works. The thousand-year-old text provides a fantastical account of Iran’s history on the National Mall through April.

(Oct. 28-31) ARABIAN SIGHTS ON ARABIAN NIGHTS And if Shamana piques your interest, the District has other offerings from the region. The 15th annual Arabian Sights Film Festival runs Thursday through Sunday at the Goethe-Institut in Northwest Washington. [CUT FOR TIME? Selections from Lebanon, Egypt, Iraq, Morocco and other nations populate this year’s slate. They even let a film from Canada take part.]

(Oct. 26-27) JEWISH LITERARY FESTIVAL DC’s Jewish Literary Festival winds down with two acclaimed authors at 16th and Q Streets in Northwest Washington. Tonight Jessica Jiji discusses Sweet Dates in Basra, the tale of lost cultural cohesion in Iraq before World War II. Tomorrow night Rebecca Newberger Goldstein plumbs the labor and rapture of religion with her novel 36 Arguments for the Existence of God.

background music: Femme D'Argent by Air

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