Candidates Take Aim At Federal Workers | WAMU 88.5 - American University Radio

: News

Filed Under:

Candidates Take Aim At Federal Workers

Play associated audio

Some candidates across the country are running on an anti-Washington campaign, and some are even running against federal employees. Extreme conservative candidates want to do away with the Department of Education. But they're a small minority.

There are more mainstream proposals that are likely to get a vote in a Republican-controlled Congress. Wyoming Rep. Cynthia Lummis wants to freeze non-defense hiring and force agencies to live without the positions vacated by two of every four retirees.

"We cannot go on growing government when the private sector that pays for federal employees through taxes is incurring this tremendous loss of jobs," Lummis says.

Steve Ressler, a federal worker, started GovLoop.com, a social network for federal employees. He says a government hiring freeze would just increase the number of private contractors.

"So if we shrink our government workforce, we still need to get all this work done. The water still needs to be clean. Our borders still need to be secure," Ressler says.

When The Daily Show's John Stewart and Stephen Colbert take to the National Mall this weekend, they're going to have to deal with Ressler's counter-rally. Ressler is standing up for the federal work force with his rally, colorfully entitled the Government Doesn't Suck March.

"I think people have a poor perception of what it actually means to be a government employee, they just kind of take a quick, easy cheap-shot," Ressler says.

Some Republicans claim the government workforce has unnecessarily grown by 188,000 people since the start of the Obama Administration. They say shrinking its size will give the private sector freedom to grow.

NPR

Not My Job: Brady Bunch's Florence Henderson Gets Quizzed On Weird Science

For decades, Florence Henderson, who presided over the Brady Bunch, was America's perfect Mom. We'll ask Henderson three questions about the Ig Nobels — awarded for real, if ridiculous, research.
NPR

Tracing A Gin-Soaked Trail In London

Around the world, new gin distilleries are popping up like mushrooms after a rain. NPR traces the boom to its historic roots in London, which once had 250 distilleries within the city limits alone.
NPR

Ranting And Throwing Papers: An Angry Candidate Runs For Congress

State Rep. Mike Bost's rants on the Illinois House floor are the stuff viral dreams are made of. Bost says he has good reason to be upset, and wants voters to share his anger.
NPR

Tech Week: Voice Mail Hang-Ups, Apple Pay And Zuckerberg's Chinese

In this week's roundup, Apple rolls out its mobile payment system but confronts a security test in China, the problem with voice mail messages and Mark Zuckerberg shows off his Mandarin.

Leave a Comment

Help keep the conversation civil. Please refer to our Terms of Use and Code of Conduct before posting your comments.