Art Beat: Monday, Oct. 25 | WAMU 88.5 - American University Radio

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Art Beat: Monday, Oct. 25

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"Art Beat" with Sabri Ben-Achour:

(Oct. 25) INDIO GIRLS Indigo Girls wrap-up a two-night stint at the Birchmere Music Hall in Alexandria tonight. The folk-rock duo from Decatur, Georgia, has balanced music with social, political, and environmental activism for some 25 years. They bring the issues, the stories, and an arsenal of acoustic guitars to the stage at 7:30.

(Oct. 26-Dec. 26) WALTER CRONKITE IS DEAD And another two women take to a Northern Virginia stage this week: one's from a blue state, the other a red, and they find common ground just in time for midterm elections in Walter Cronkite Is Dead, making its District debut tomorrow at Signature Theatre in Arlington. Award-winning playwright Joe Calarco's intimate comedy considers our choices, regrets, and struggles through late December.

(Oct. 26-Nov. 28) MORE THAN A GLIMPSE Outside of the obvious beauty of his drawings, Lee Newman's work is most exceptional for it's ability to appear both accidental and completely calculated. Glimpse is a tellingly titled exhibit of the artist’s drawings, proofs, and prints on display at Pyramid Atlantic Art Center in Silver Spring for one month beginning tomorrow.

background music: "American Dream" by Jakatta (Afterlife Mix)

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