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D.C. Attorney General Launches Investigation Into Council Member

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D.C. Attorney General Peter Nickles wants information and documents on Team Thomas, a non-profit that Councilmember Harry Thomas started in 2000 to support youth sports.

According to a letter delivered to Thomas, the non-profit is not registered with the IRS or in good standing with the city government. The investigation appears to focus on Thomas' efforts to raise money for the group.

Thomas has been a critic of Nickles and the Fenty Administration, and he says the probe is "politically motivated." But Thomas says he will comply with the investigation.

"I will be forthcoming and forthright with getting whatever I can because the constituents I serve know my integrity, and the community I come from knows where I stand," Thomas says, "and I am going to make sure my reputation is not tarnished by something that someone is trying to do."

The letter threatens to subpoena the information if it is not received by Tuesday.

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