: News

Filed Under:

MoCo Firefighters Fight Ambulance Fees

Play associated audio

Later today, fire chiefs from across the D.C. region will gather to support ambulance user fees in Maryland's Montgomery County.

Voters in Montgomery County will decide at the polls next month whether the fees will be implemented. Montgomery County is the lone jurisdiction in the area that does not charge the fees. County Fire Chief Richard Bowers says county residents would not even be charged them.

"It's not a bill. It's not a tax, or it's not a fee to any county resident. It is revenue that is already paid for by the insurance companies. Generally in everyone's premium that they have already paid for," Bowers says.

Volunteer firefighters in Montgomery have fought the fees at every turn, and were successful in getting the measure on the ballot before voters. They believe people will be less likely to call 9-1-1 for an ambulance because they might have to pay for riding in one.

If voters reject the fees, County Executive Isiah Leggett has proposed $14 million in budget cuts that include layoffs of firefighters. Opponents say Leggett's proposal is political and designed to scare voters into voting for the fees.

NPR

In Pakistan, Literary Spring Is Both Renaissance And Resistance

For the past decade Pakistan has faced war, political instability and the rise of religious extremism. But those crises have fueled a new generation of Pakistani writers and artists.
NPR

Behold Ukrainian Easter Art: Incredible, Inedible Eggs

Even 2,000 years ago, people seemed to know that the egg could be a source of life. And an ancient art form has been passed down, transforming a symbolic source of food into a dazzling decoration.
NPR

Obama's Tax Rate Rose — And He Can't Blame Anyone But Himself

President Obama, like many wealthy Americans, is paying more of his income to the IRS. He and the first lady paid $98,169 in taxes for 2013 on income of $481,098.
NPR

Between Heartbleed And Homeland, NSA Treads Cybersecurity Gray Area

Amid controversy over the Heartbleed security bug, the White House clarified how U.S. intelligence agencies must handle such bugs. Bloomberg Businessweek cybersecurity reporter Michael Riley explains.

Leave a Comment

Help keep the conversation civil. Please refer to our Terms of Use and Code of Conduct before posting your comments.