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Art Beat: Wednesday, Oct. 20

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"Art Beat" with Sabri Ben-Achour:

(Oct. 20) THE EXTRA LENS The Extra Lens used to be called The Extra Glenns, which was a collaboration between The Mountain Goats and The Human Hearts, but let’s not complicate things. Two master lyricists weave stories together with simple acoustic guitar progressions and ornate arrangements tonight at Northeast Washington’s Rock & Roll Hotel.

(Oct. 23) SWEET HONEY DC’s Sweet Honey in the Rock tells a different story Saturday night at Washington’s Warner Theatre. The a cappella ensemble performs songs form the Black church, bringing the clarion calls of the civil rights movement to contemporary audiences. The traditional is transformed by dance and frenetic hand percussion by six women influenced in equal measure by hip-hop, jazz, African chants, and ancient lullabies.

(Oct. 21-Jan. 16) GUILLERMO’S EVERYTHING Argentine artist Guillermo Kuitca has circled the globe, and that’s fitting: The artist explores themes of migration and disappearance, often featuring mapping motifs in his paintings. Guillermo Kuitca: Everything opens tomorrow at the Mall’s Hirshhorn Museum.


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