D.C. Schools Recognized For Healthy Meals | WAMU 88.5 - American University Radio

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D.C. Schools Recognized For Healthy Meals

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A national doctors' group is giving school lunches in the District a grade of "A+."

The Physicians Committee for Responsible Medicine has given D.C. schools one of its Golden Carrot Awards, which go to districts that offer healthy lunches and get children to actually eat them.

Jeffrey Mills, the food service director at D.C. public schools, says this year they made several changes to their menus, including cutting flavored milk and making sure 20 percent of all food served comes from local sources.

"Last year, it was basically a heat-and-serve model. It was a lot of processed frozen foods. It was...basically un-thawed or a bag was cut open and heated up. This year, there are some minimally processed foods, but mostly it is unprocessed," Mills says.

Meanwhile, school leaders in neighboring Montgomery County, Md., will learn later today whether their district will receive the Broad Prize For Urban Education. The $2-million prize is the largest education award in the country given to school districts.

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