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Army Says Blood Test Detects Concussions

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The Army says they're using a new blood test that can accurately diagnose concussions.

The test looks for protein markers that spill out into the blood stream after cells are damaged from a mild traumatic brain injury. The Army says the process has accurately diagnosed more than 30 patients.

But some doctors want more proof that this test is more effective at detecting concussions than traditional methods, such as MRIs and other screening tests.

"This research is in its early phase," says Jonathan Slotkin, a neurosurgeon with Washington Hospital Center. "This is a limited number of people this was tested on, and what we are really gonna need is long-term information on whether or not the initial results the blood test gives are accurate. Do they predict how you look in one day? Does it predict how you look in one week or six months?"

Banyan Biomarkers, the company that worked with the Army to create the test, plans to conduct a large set of clinical trials on 1,200 brain injury patients next year.

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