: News

Ehrlich And O'Malley Square Off For Second Time

Play associated audio

Plenty of questions were asked during today's Maryland governor's debate, sponsored in part by WAMU. But both Gov. Martin O'Malley and former Gov. Bob Ehrlich accused each other of not answering those questions.

Ehrlich was asked how he would make up hundreds of millions of dollars in revenue if he repeals an increase in the state sales tax that O'Malley approved. O'Malley wasn't impressed with his predecessor's answer.

"I believe the answer to the...last question, asked repeatedly, was that he has no idea how he would make up the 700-800 million [dollar] shortfall," he said.

Ehrlich responded in kind when O'Malley was asked how he would fund the Purple Line mass transit project in Montgomery and Prince George's Counties, which O'Malley wants constructed as light rail.

"You did not get an answer to your question. TIF's do not get you there. The only thing that gets you there is a massive gas tax increase, or some major infusion of dollars into the transportation trust fund," Ehrlich said.

There was nothing but disagreement on several other topics, including state pensions, illegal immigration, same-sex marriage and utilities. Pepco struggled to restore service after several thunderstorms over the summer. O'Malley talked of creating service standards for utilities, and went after Ehrlich for utility rate hikes.

Two more debates will be conducted next week. Election day is less than three weeks away.

NPR

Writer James Alan McPherson, Winner Of Pulitzer, MacArthur And Guggenheim, Dies At 72

McPherson, the first African-American to win the Pulitzer Prize for fiction, has died at 72. His work explored the intersection of white and black lives with deftness, subtlety and wry humor.
NPR

QUIZ: How Much Do You Know About Presidents And Food?

It's week two of the party conventions, and all these speeches are making us hungry. So we made a quiz to test your savvy about presidents and our favorite topic, food.
NPR

WATCH: Albright Says It's 'Almost Too Hard To Express' Excitement Over Clinton

"I think she is brilliant and ... she's not a diva at all. She works very hard," Albright told NPR's Rachel Martin.
NPR

Police Use Fingertip Replicas To Unlock A Murder Victim's Phone

Michigan State University engineers tried 3-D-printed fingertips and special conductive replicas of the victim's fingerprints to crack the biometric lock on his Samsung Galaxy phone.

Leave a Comment

Help keep the conversation civil. Please refer to our Terms of Use and Code of Conduct before posting your comments.