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Art Beat: Thursday, Oct. 14

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"Art Beat" with Sabri Ben-Achour: Thursday, Oct. 14

(Oct. 14) THE OLMSTED CONNECTION Though we may not realize it, we’re all a little indebted to Frederick Law Olmsted. The seminal landscape architect and his progeny designed more than 5,000 of our campuses, neighborhoods, and parks, including the National Mall, Central Park, and National Zoo, which shows some love tonight at 6:30 with a screening of The Olmsted Legacy. The documentary follows Olmstead from his days as a New York Times correspondent to his years creating green spaces using mostly his own words.

(Oct. 16) KIDOPERA If you’re having trouble convincing your kids that opera has so much more to offer than Miley, the Washington National Opera is here to help this Saturday at The Kennedy Center. Family Look-in follows four inquisitive moppets through a whirlwind tour of the opera universe. Figaro, Madama Butterfly, and other opera stars make cameos.

(Oct. 16) INSIDE OUT DANCE DC’s Joy of Motion Dance Center turns 34 this weekend and they’re celebrating the only way they know how. Inside Out Joy of Motion on Stage brings a number of disparate dance troupes to the Atlas Performing Arts Center Saturday night for an evening of traditional, modern, and international moves.

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