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Va. Rep. Lets Challenger's Accusations Go Unanswered In Debate

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In Virginia, Democratic Rep. Jim Moran took the stage with Republican challenger Patrick Murray on the campus of George Mason University today.

Murray went on the offensive in today's debate, accusing Moran of engaging in pay-to-play tactics with the giant new Department of Defense building along I-395.

"The fact of the matter is, it's in his district, it's a federal building, he appropriated it, he took campaign contributions, and there's not even an exit ramp," Murray says.

Moran, serving his tenth term representing Arlington and Alexandria, seemed content to let Murray's volley go unanswered.

"I'm not supposed to get upset in these debates, so just move on to the next topic. It's not worth responding, frankly," Moran says.

Moran may feel he's in a position to ignore attacks from his opponent because polls show him leading.

Candidates for the neighboring district, Democrat Gerry Connolly and Republican challenger Keith Fimian, also debated at the Chamber today, and are locked in a tighter race.

Neither has the same luxury.

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