Voters See Candidates, Not PAC Influence | WAMU 88.5 - American University Radio

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Voters See Candidates, Not PAC Influence

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Maryland and Virginia lawmakers are dropping a lot of cash into congressional races across the country. Some candidates for office came out to the local high school football match in Nashua, N.H., to pitch themselves to voters.

When they’re on trail, all voters see are the candidates. But behind the candidate lies the support of the party back in Washington. Through his political action committee, Maryland Democrat Chris Van Hollen has spread about half a million dollars to candidates across the country. He says his assistance to the party is an extension of his work as a representative.

"It's my strong view that the policies of the Democratic Congress will serve my constituents much better than the alternative," Van Hollen says.

Maryland Democrat and Majority Leader Steny Hoyer has spent nearly $900,000 on this year's races. And Virginia Republican and Minority Whip Eric Cantor has spread $1.2 million to candidates nationwide.

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