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Politics and Prose Co-Founder Passes Away

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Carla Cohen, co-owner of the Washington independent bookstore that became a city institution and a key stop for writers of all political stripes, has died.

Cohen helped found Politics and Prose in 1984 with business partner Barbara Meade. The bookstore started as a small operation with just three employees. It's grown not only in size--it's now a 13,000-square-foot space with upwards of 55 employees--but in stature as well. The bookstore is a literary fixture in D.C. It's a touchstone for any serious book tour and has drawn Nobel laureates and presidents as well as the not-quite-yet famous authors.

Cohen was a Baltimore native. She was at one time a city planner and a Congressional aide. Politics and Prose, announced on its website that Cohen died Monday of cancer of the bile ducts. She was 74.

A funeral will be held at Tifereth Israel, 7701 16th Street, N.W. , at 1:30 p.m. on Wednesday, Oct. 13.

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