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Groups Provide Healthy Food to Under-served Communities

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Local nonprofit groups are working to provide affordable, healthy foods to under-served communities in D.C. Roadside Organics and the Hip Hop Caucus hosted a local food block party over the weekend.

The event was part of 350.org's Global Work Party, an international campaign aimed at creating community projects that cut carbon and build clean energy.

"Local food can affect climate change because a tremendous amount of petroleum and fossil fuels are used to grow industrial food. Accessing healthy food is something we should strive for and the point behind this is really to drawing attention to this issue to to driving that conversation forward," says Seth Teicher, co-founder of Roadside Organics.

Chefs from several D.C. restaurants handed out free seasonal food and local entertainers took the stage to raise awareness about food deserts in D.C., those communities that don't have access to healthy foods.

Organizers funded the event through donations. They surpassed their $1,500 goal.


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