Cheating Scandal In P.G.'s Police Dept. Blamed On Laziness | WAMU 88.5 - American University Radio

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Cheating Scandal In P.G.'s Police Dept. Blamed On Laziness

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By Jonathan Wilson

In Maryland, the police chief in Prince George's County says that laziness from an instructor, and not cheating by cadets, is what led to a slew of perfect scores on police academy exams last year.

Police Chief Roberto Hylton says an internal audit showed that out of laziness, an instructor recorded perfect scores for more than 30 cadets who graduated in July 2009 and are now officers.

But when the tests were checked, Hylton says investigators found there was a range of scores, though all the officers had passed.

Hylton says the instructor has been fined, but remains at the academy. The officers involved are not being suspended.

Still, Hylton says he will work with the Maryland Police and Correctional Training Commissions, which certify officers and inspect academies, to audit the files of that class and the two that followed it.

Prince George's County State's Attorney Glenn Ivey has launched his own investigation into the test results and how they could affect cases the officers handled.

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