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Va. Congressman Only Gives The Best To His Donors

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By Sara Sciammacco

One Virginia congressman doesn’t settle for just any brand when picking chocolates for campaign donors. For his political fundraisers this election cycle, House Minority Whip Eric Cantor has spent nearly $7,500 on gourmet chocolates.

Congressman Eric Cantor has shopped locally and as far away as Beverly Hills for his chocolates. Campaign finance experts say Cantor’s attitude toward candy illustrates the lengths lawmakers will go to make campaign fundraisers a memorable experience for high-dollar donors. Meredith McGehee is with the watchdog group, Campaign Legal Center.

"As usual, it is what is legal in Washington that is the scandal," McGehee says.

Cantor, who declined comment for this story, also spent $88,000 at a luxury ski hotel in Colorado and $69,000 on fundraisers for chic Hollywood hotels and catering.

Like Cantor, Majority Leader Steny Hoyer of Maryland has upscale taste. He spent $50,000 at an Arizona resort and $130,000 on a Maryland caterer.

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