P.G. Co. State's Attorney Says Police Academy Cheating Scandal Could Jeopardize Prosecutions | WAMU 88.5 - American University Radio

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P.G. Co. State's Attorney Says Police Academy Cheating Scandal Could Jeopardize Prosecutions

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By Jonathan Wilson

In Maryland, the state's attorney for Prince George's County says an investigation into whether police cadets cheated on police academy tests could jeopardize many of his prosecutions.

State's Attorney Glenn Ivey says his office is busy reviewing cases handled by the officers in question. But he's also awaiting the final results of an internal police department probe. 146 officers from three police academy classes are under investigation--with 34 officers facing specific allegations of cheating.

Department records show many cadets had perfect scores on at least 11 tests measuring their police skills.

Ivey says he was surprised he hadn't been told about the investigation sooner.

"The key is to make sure the cases have the integrity and the evidence necessary to pursue them," he says.

Ivey says he expects an update from police chief Roberto Hylton on the internal police department probe later today.

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