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    WASHINGTON (AP) The company behind a high-tech sound device that aimed to keep teens from loitering in a Washington neighborhood has squashed use of the controversial product. The device, called ``The Mosquito,'' costs about $1,000 and emits a high-pitched beeping sound that only young people can generally hear.

    WASHINGTON (AP) The laws signed by Adolf Hitler taking away the citizenship of German Jews before the killing of 6 million people during the Holocaust are on rare public display in Washington. The Nuremberg Laws were recently turned over to the National Archives by The Huntington museum complex near Los Angeles.

    WASHINGTON (AP) Democratic National Committee chairman Tim Kaine says the party is concerned about an enthusiasm gap'' this election year, but there's still enough time to get a good turnout. Kaine also tells NBC'sToday'' show that differences exist among Democrats but such diversity is a good thing.

    PHILADELPHIA (AP) Philadelphia's transit agency, and others in the U.S., including in Washington, hope to save money by storing energy created when subways put on the brakes. The agencies are experimenting with ways to store energy created when trains brake into batteries for later use.

    (Copyright 2010 by The Associated Press. All Rights Reserved.)


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