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    WASHINGTON (AP) The company behind a high-tech sound device that aimed to keep teens from loitering in a Washington neighborhood has squashed use of the controversial product. The device, called ``The Mosquito,'' costs about $1,000 and emits a high-pitched beeping sound that only young people can generally hear.

    WASHINGTON (AP) The laws signed by Adolf Hitler taking away the citizenship of German Jews before the killing of 6 million people during the Holocaust are on rare public display in Washington. The Nuremberg Laws were recently turned over to the National Archives by The Huntington museum complex near Los Angeles.

    WASHINGTON (AP) Democratic National Committee chairman Tim Kaine says the party is concerned about an enthusiasm gap'' this election year, but there's still enough time to get a good turnout. Kaine also tells NBC'sToday'' show that differences exist among Democrats but such diversity is a good thing.

    PHILADELPHIA (AP) Philadelphia's transit agency, and others in the U.S., including in Washington, hope to save money by storing energy created when subways put on the brakes. The agencies are experimenting with ways to store energy created when trains brake into batteries for later use.

    (Copyright 2010 by The Associated Press. All Rights Reserved.)

    NPR

    Many Comedians Have 'The Daily Show' To Thank For Their Thriving Careers

    As Jon Stewart's final week hosting The Daily Show gets underway, we examine the show's legacy and the many careers and spinoffs it's launched.
    NPR

    Confronting A Shortage Of Eggs, Bakers Get Creative With Replacements

    Eggs are becoming more expensive and scarce recently because so many chickens have died from avian flu. So bakers, in particular, are looking for cheaper ingredients that can work just as well.
    WAMU 88.5

    How Artificial Intelligence And Robots Will Impact Jobs And How We Think About Work

    Many experts say artificial intelligence and robots will displace jobs at a faster and faster pace over the coming decade. What changes in technology could mean for how we work.

    WAMU 88.5

    How Artificial Intelligence And Robots Will Impact Jobs And How We Think About Work

    Many experts say artificial intelligence and robots will displace jobs at a faster and faster pace over the coming decade. What changes in technology could mean for how we work.

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