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Developers Have Big Plans For New Carrollton

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Developers filled a conference room at Metro's headquarters to hear the details of Metro's plans to develop 39 acres at the New Carrollton station.
David Schultz
Developers filled a conference room at Metro's headquarters to hear the details of Metro's plans to develop 39 acres at the New Carrollton station.

By David Schultz

Some of the region's top developers have big plans for the New Carrollton area in Prince George's County, Maryland. They want to build offices, apartments, even a hotel, at the New Carrollton Metro station.

Several dozen developers are congregating outside a conference room at Metro headquarters, eagerly waiting to hear what Metro is planning on doing with the 39 acres it owns near the New Carrollton Station.

"We're seating the developers in the first three rows," says an organizer.

The standing-room-only crowd is an indication of just how valuable those 39 acres could be. The New Carrollton Station has access to not only Metro, Amtrak and MARC, but also Route 50 and the Beltway and, in a few years, the Purple Line.

So what makes this piece of land so exciting? Scott Nordheimer, with the firm Urban Atlantic, sums it up with one word: "Transportation."

Nordheimer says New Carrollton could become the new Silver Spring.

"It could be better, because it has much more scope. It will take much longer but, again, the scale of it could be just fabulous," says Nordheimer.

Metro says it will begin developing its 39 acres by early 2012, and it hopes that will spur other builders to snatch up surrounding areas.

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