Arlington School Cafeterias Struggle To Meet Code | WAMU 88.5 - American University Radio

: News

Filed Under:

Arlington School Cafeterias Struggle To Meet Code

Play associated audio

By Michael Pope

In 2006, Arlington Public Schools hired a consultant to visit the county’s public school cafeterias. The consultant found numerous health code violations--everything from dead cockroaches to chemicals stored next to food.

Administrators put together an action plan and set out to clean up the county’s cafeterias.

But an analysis of three years of inspection reports since that time shows problems remain. Five schools logged more than 20 health code violations in the three-year period following the consultant’s report. And, according to documents from the Virginia Department of Health, problems at one middle school included paint flaking onto food surfaces and stained ceiling tiles in a dry storage area.

School Board Chairwoman Libby Garvey points to changes that have been made since the 2006 consultant study, including using more locally grown produce and ongoing staff training exercises to teach food safety.

NPR

Stephen Hawking Says Zayn Malik Could Still Be In One Direction In A Parallel Universe

Millions of hearts were broken last month when Zayn Malik left One Direction, but according to physicist Stephen Hawking, that might not be the case after all.
NPR

Competitive Bartender Pours Father's Wisdom Into Signature Drink

Bartender Ran Duan will represent the U.S. in a Bacardi international cocktail competition. His specialty? "Father's Advice," a stirred-not-shaken cocktail that's a testament to his hardworking dad.
NPR

3 Reasons Republicans Might Cheer A Pro-Gay-Marriage Ruling

The Supreme Court hears arguments on same-sex-marriage bans Tuesday. And even though Republicans are the traditional-marriage party, they just could welcome a pro-same-sex marriage ruling.
NPR

Google Experimenting With Patent Marketplace To Combat Trolls

Google will allow patent holders to "tell Google about patents they're willing to sell at a price they set." Tech firms have been targeted by "trolls" who own patents and charge them licensing fees.

Leave a Comment

Help keep the conversation civil. Please refer to our Terms of Use and Code of Conduct before posting your comments.