: News

Filed Under:

Arlington School Cafeterias Struggle To Meet Code

Play associated audio

By Michael Pope

In 2006, Arlington Public Schools hired a consultant to visit the county’s public school cafeterias. The consultant found numerous health code violations--everything from dead cockroaches to chemicals stored next to food.

Administrators put together an action plan and set out to clean up the county’s cafeterias.

But an analysis of three years of inspection reports since that time shows problems remain. Five schools logged more than 20 health code violations in the three-year period following the consultant’s report. And, according to documents from the Virginia Department of Health, problems at one middle school included paint flaking onto food surfaces and stained ceiling tiles in a dry storage area.

School Board Chairwoman Libby Garvey points to changes that have been made since the 2006 consultant study, including using more locally grown produce and ongoing staff training exercises to teach food safety.

NPR

Cult Survivor Documents 2 Decades Inside 'Holy Hell'

Will Allen directed the documentary Holy Hell, which depicts his experience as a videographer and member of The Buddhafield cult. Allen used his own footage, as well as his interviews with other former members, to make this documentary.
NPR

Evaporated Cane Juice? Puh-leeze. Just Call It Sugar, FDA Says

Companies cultivating a healthful image often list "evaporated cane juice" in their products' ingredients. But the FDA says it's really just sugar, and that's what food labels should call it.
NPR

Meet The Unbound Delegates Who Helped Donald Trump Secure The Nomination

NPR's Don Gonyea talks with some of the unbound delegates who decided to support Donald Trump, thereby giving him the magic number of delegates to clinch the Republican nomination.
NPR

After Departure Of Uber, Lyft In Austin, New Companies Enter The Void

Earlier this month, voters in Austin, Texas, rejected an effort to overturn the city's rules for ride-hailing companies. Uber and Lyft tried to prevent fingerprinting of their drivers, and now both have left town. A few other ride-share companies have popped up to help fill the void. NPR explores how people are getting around town without Uber and Lyft.

Leave a Comment

Help keep the conversation civil. Please refer to our Terms of Use and Code of Conduct before posting your comments.