: News

Cuccinelli Renews Climate Investigation into Former UVA Professor

Play associated audio

By Sabri Ben-Achour

Virginia's Attorney General, Ken Cuccinelli, is renewing his effort to investigate a former University of Virginia professor for fraud--an investigation that many scientists and faculty are calling an ideological witch hunt.

The attorney general doesn't believe in climate change, and he believes that a world renowned climate scientist who used to teach at UVA committed fraud in his grant funded research.

In May, he ordered the university to turn over vast quantities of documents and correspondence between about 40 people, including any email, letter, handwritten or drawn piece of information that mentioned professor Michael Mann. The university retained legal counsel and fought.

Last August, a judge ruled that the attorney general hadn't explained, as required by law, how exactly Professor Mann had done anything fraudulent and dismissed Cuccinelli's demands. Last week Cuccinelli renewed his investigation, fleshing out how he believes Mann's research lacks statistical rigor.

The Union of Concerned Scientists, among many other groups, have likened this to ideological persecution.

NPR

Why Does Every New Restaurant Look Like A Factory?

The stripped-down look of exposed brick, poured cement floors, and Edison light bulbs is popular in restaurants across America. One reporter dares to ask, "Seriously, why?"
NPR

Why Does Every New Restaurant Look Like A Factory?

The stripped-down look of exposed brick, poured cement floors, and Edison light bulbs is popular in restaurants across America. One reporter dares to ask, "Seriously, why?"
WAMU 88.5

Why Local Nonprofits Haven't Fixed Poverty

As long as there has been poverty, there have been people trying to end it. We explore the obstacles and inefficiencies local nonprofits run into when trying to solve society's stubborn problem.

WAMU 88.5

Can We Trust Our Cars?

There were more airbag recalls this week, and VW has agreed to pay nearly fifteen billion in its emissions cheating scandal. Meanwhile, cars with driverless technology are becoming available, but whether they will make us safer is up for debate. A look at auto safety and consumer trust.

Leave a Comment

Help keep the conversation civil. Please refer to our Terms of Use and Code of Conduct before posting your comments.