Terror Alert In Europe Doesn't Seem To Deter Travelers | WAMU 88.5 - American University Radio

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Terror Alert In Europe Doesn't Seem To Deter Travelers

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By Jonathan Wilson

Travelers flying out of the U.S. to Europe do so under a rare advisory from the state department about terrorism threats there. However, travel out of Dulles International Airport doesn't seem to be affected.

The state department has issued a travel alert, a step below a formal warning not to visit Europe.

The alert advises the hundreds of thousands of U.S. citizens living in or traveling to Europe to take extra precautions about personal security, especially in public places.

Here at Dulles, most international flights don't depart until the afternoon.

The few international passengers here this morning seem convinced this is just another temporary concern. One man I talked with travels regularly to visit his family in Spain, and says he is most concerned about the effect on the European tourism industry if the alert lasts for an extended period of time. He says he thinks an alert like this does change the perception of Europe for a lot of Americans.

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