Environmental Advocates Seek Government Help For Intersex Fish Research | WAMU 88.5 - American University Radio

: News

Environmental Advocates Seek Government Help For Intersex Fish Research

Play associated audio

By Sabri Ben-Achour

Some citizens' groups are petitioning the federal government for help in determining why certain fish in the Potomac River continue to show developmental abnormalities.

Approximately 80 percent of male small mouth bass in the Potomac have a condition known as intersex, it's where they grow female reproductive tissues in their sex organs.

It's not clear why, but the main suspect is something humans are leaking into the water. It could be residues from anything from antidepressants to birth control or old prescriptions flushed down the toilet.

Scientists have found that aquatic life can be affected by incredibly low levels of such compounds--so low that only recent technology could even detect them. But they don't have a more specific answer at this point.

The environmental advocacy group the Potomac Conservancy has submitted 5,000 signatures to Virginia Representative Jim Moran in hopes of increasing funding to research the problem.

NPR

Lowly Worm Is Back! Richard Scarry Jr. Brings Dad's Manuscript To Life

The younger Scarry, also an illustrator, found a draft of Best Lowly Worm Book Ever! in his dad's Swiss chalet. He says all that was missing was the final art, "so that's what I did."
NPR

A Food Crisis Follows Africa's Ebola Crisis

Food shortages are emerging in the wake of West Africa's Ebola epidemic. Market shelves are bare and fields are neglected because traders can't move and social gatherings are discouraged.
WAMU 88.5

McDonnell Corruption Trial: Former Gov Defends Relationship With Jonnie Williams

On the stand today, the former Virginia governor defended his relationship with the businessman at the heart of the trial, saying it was appropriate.
NPR

New Camouflage Material Is A Color-Change Artist

Researchers say they've produced octopus-inspired materials that can sense color and change accordingly. NPR's Scott Simon talks to John Rogers, professor of engineering at the University of Illinois.

Leave a Comment

Help keep the conversation civil. Please refer to our Terms of Use and Code of Conduct before posting your comments.