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ANNAPOLIS, Md. (AP) Beginning today, Maryland has a new ban on using handheld cell phones while driving, Also taking effect are new laws aimed at cracking down on sex offenders and increasing child support payments.

HUNT VALLEY, Md. (AP) Baltimore County will once again be the host of the annual Susan G. Komen Race for the Cure on Sunday. The event raises money for breast cancer research and support programs for those affected by the disease.

TOWSON, Md. (AP) Artificial limbs and patent medicines are on the agenda of an annual conference on Civil War medicine in Towson. The event opens today and is organized by the National Museum of Civil War Medicine in Frederick.

BALTIMORE (AP) Authorities in Maryland were urging the drivers of trailers and large vehicles to use caution when crossing the Bay Bridge because of high winds. Yesterday a recorded information line for the bridge, 1-877-BAYSPAN, was urging drivers of those vehicles to use caution because sustained wind speeds in the area were between 30 and 39 miles per hour.

(Copyright 2010 by The Associated Press. All Rights Reserved.)

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