EPA Calls Out Virginia | WAMU 88.5 - American University Radio

: News

EPA Calls Out Virginia

Play associated audio

By Sabri Ben-Achour

The Environmental Protection Agency announced it will spend nearly a half billion dollars on Chesapeake Bay restoration in the coming year to help states comply with growing pressure from the federal government to restore the bay. But not all states are falling in line.

The plan includes money for controling agricultural runoff and stormwater that washes nitrogen and phosphorous into the Chesapeake Bay. But states are already showing mixed progress.

Last week the EPA said restoration roadmaps from the District and Maryland were in good shape, but several other states, notably Virginia, were not.

The EPA complained that Virginia actually removed regulations that would clean up agricultural runoff, had no plans for inspections, and instead of presenting a detailed plan, offered up a few vague statements.

Virginia's Secretary of the Environment Doug Domenech countered that the state was still reeling from recession and said the EPA's plans to crack down on runoff and sediment would cause economic harm to it's citizens.

NPR

A Tome Of Peruvian Food, By Its Most Acclaimed Ambassador

Gaston Acurio is the world's premiere cheerleader for Peruvian cuisine, and he's just written a cookbook. It's called Peru: The Cookbook, and has 500 recipes — including more than 20 kinds of ceviche.
NPR

A Tome Of Peruvian Food, By Its Most Acclaimed Ambassador

Gaston Acurio is the world's premiere cheerleader for Peruvian cuisine, and he's just written a cookbook. It's called Peru: The Cookbook, and has 500 recipes — including more than 20 kinds of ceviche.
WAMU 88.5

Virginia Candidates Spending Big On Consultants, Postage

The political consultants need to get paid, and that direct mail needs postage. Then there's the website and the campaign staff. These are the things candidates in the upcoming Virginia primary are spending big money on.
NPR

Threatened Online? Supreme Court Says Prosecutors Must Prove Intent

Justices declined to delineate exactly what sort of evidence could prove that an online post — such as "took all the strength I had not to ... slit her throat" — was intended to spark fear.

Leave a Comment

Help keep the conversation civil. Please refer to our Terms of Use and Code of Conduct before posting your comments.