EPA Unveils Bay Restoration Action Plan, $491 Million in Funding | WAMU 88.5 - American University Radio

: News

EPA Unveils Bay Restoration Action Plan, $491 Million in Funding

Play associated audio

By Sabri Ben-Achour

The federal government is unveiling its first action plan for the Chesapeake Bay - including $491 million in funding for restoration.

Just days afteer coming into office, President Obama signed an executive order directing the federal government to restore the Chesapeake Bay. Since then the EPA has started to develop rules and pollution limits for states, and the latest item is this nearly half billion dollars in funding--much of it to help states get on board.

There's $134 million for conservation in places where runoff from agriculture is a particular problem. A little more than half of that will go to farmers to help them pay for voluntary conservation projects.

That can include fencing cattle out of streams or special planting methods that reduce nitrogen leakage into waterways. There's also $170 million for wastewater treatment upgrades. The EPA also says it's putting together an enforcement strategy as well.

You can find more about the executive order here.

WAMU 88.5

Capital Fringe Fest's 'Bethesda' Hits Close To Home

The annual Capital Fringe Festival, which aims to bring new energy and artists to the D.C. area performing arts community, is back. This year's program includes one play that hits close to home.
NPR

Economists Say Inflation Is Tame; Consumers Aren't Buying It

On paper, inflation has been low this year. But consumers buying food or fuel may disagree. Prices for beef, eggs, fresh fruit and many other foods are much higher than overall inflation.
NPR

Administration Officials Defend Funding Request To Stem Border Crisis

President Obama has asked for $3.7 billion to deal with the southern border crisis. There are predictions the number of unaccompanied children entering the U.S. could reach 90,000 by October.
NPR

NSA Implementing Fix To Prevent Snowden-Like Security Breach

A year after Edward Snowden's digital heist, the NSA's chief technology officer says steps have been taken to stop future incidents. But he says there's no way for the NSA to be entirely secure.

Leave a Comment

Help keep the conversation civil. Please refer to our Terms of Use and Code of Conduct before posting your comments.