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Alexandria Lawmakers Hold Townhall on ABC Privatization

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By Jonathan Wilson

In Alexandria, Virginia tonight, two state lawmakers are holding a town hall meeting about Governor Bob McDonnell's plan to privatize the state's liquor stores to raise money for transportation.

State Senator Toddy Puller and freshman State Delegate Scott Surovell have both expressed skepticism about the governor's plan, and will get a chance tonight to see if their constituents feel the same way.

The governor's main aim behind ABC privatization is to raise money for transportation projects -- McDonnell says auctioning off the stores will raise half a billion dollars up front for infrastructure needs, but plan means the state will bring in $21 million less per year in revenue.

Puller has said the projected revenue numbers from the sale of liquor stores are overly optimistic.

Surovell says the Governor's plan will leave the state with less money to spend on schools, prisons and mental health services.

Virginia has sold liquor through state-owned stores since the end of Prohibition in 1934.

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