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Montgomery County Critical In Maryland Governor's Race

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By Matt Bush In Maryland, the governor's race could hinge on Montgomery County, normally a loyal Democratic stronghold.

In 2006, Democrat Martin O'Malley carried Montgomery County easily over Republican Bob Ehrlich. While the candidates will be the same this year, it's yet to be seen whether the results will be in the state's most populous county.

Ehrlich thinks he can trim O'Malley's advantage by focusing on the fact the county receives around 17 cents in state funding for every dollar it pays in state taxes. O'Malley, who was born and raised in the county, says while he's not taking Montgomery County for granted, he remains confident he will do well there this fall.

"We're all in this together, and the quality of life that the people of Montgomery County defend, is not something they defend alone. It is something our state also defends and protects. And Montgomery County is one of the big reasons why our state is getting through this recession better than others," O'Malley says.

O'Malley won only five of the state's 24 jurisdictions in 2006, but that was enough to score a six percentage point win.

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