Rhee And Gray To Discuss D.C. School System's Future | WAMU 88.5 - American University Radio

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Rhee And Gray To Discuss D.C. School System's Future

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By Patrick Madden

D.C. Schools Chancellor Michelle Rhee is expected to meet with Vincent Gray tomorrow to discuss her future with the school system.

Gray’s spokeswoman confirms the council chairman and the Democratic nominee for mayor will meet with Rhee tomorrow at noon in Gray’s office at the Wilson Building.

Gray will likely serve as D.C.’s next mayor because the city is overwhelmingly Democratic and there are no Republican candidates running.

So far, Gray has not said if he plans to keep the school chancellor--and Rhee has not disclosed her plans either. But last week, she said the election outcome was, in her words, devastating for the school children of Washington. She later clarified her remarks, saying she was not trying to criticize Vincent Gray.

Also, two D.C. councilmembers are on the record saying they want Gray to keep Rhee on board for an extended transition that would allow her to serve until June 2012.

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