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Civil Rights Leader, Walters, Remembered

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By Matt Laslo

Friends and family of civil rights leader Ronald E. Walters say they are trying to remember his legacy through action. Walters died this month at the age of 72.

Even while dying of cancer Walters spent time educating people about civil rights. In the 50's and 60's he helped protest segregation throughout the United States. Walters went on to teach at Howard University and the University of Maryland.

At a funeral Monday, leaders of the Congressional black Caucus praised Walters as a leader and a source of ideas. Reverend Jesse Jackson gave his eulogy.

"He was always there. A real scholar, activist, servant," says Jackson.

Gary Flowers, the CEO of the Black Leadership Forum, says Walters must be remembered through continuing to fight for civil rights reforms.

"The civil right movement is still going because there are still meaningful demonstrative gaps in society:in education, in jobs, in health, and that's why we must stay on the battlefield," says Flowers.

Walters was buried at the Gate of Heaven Cemetery in Silver Spring, Maryland.

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