Civil Rights Leader, Walters, Remembered | WAMU 88.5 - American University Radio

: News

Civil Rights Leader, Walters, Remembered

Play associated audio

By Matt Laslo

Friends and family of civil rights leader Ronald E. Walters say they are trying to remember his legacy through action. Walters died this month at the age of 72.

Even while dying of cancer Walters spent time educating people about civil rights. In the 50's and 60's he helped protest segregation throughout the United States. Walters went on to teach at Howard University and the University of Maryland.

At a funeral Monday, leaders of the Congressional black Caucus praised Walters as a leader and a source of ideas. Reverend Jesse Jackson gave his eulogy.

"He was always there. A real scholar, activist, servant," says Jackson.

Gary Flowers, the CEO of the Black Leadership Forum, says Walters must be remembered through continuing to fight for civil rights reforms.

"The civil right movement is still going because there are still meaningful demonstrative gaps in society:in education, in jobs, in health, and that's why we must stay on the battlefield," says Flowers.

Walters was buried at the Gate of Heaven Cemetery in Silver Spring, Maryland.

NPR

In 'Transparent,' Transgender Issues Are A Family Affair

Amazon Studios' Transparent features a slate of well-known actors playing a family dealing with the revelation that the person they'd known as Mort, their father, is a transgender woman.
NPR

Syrup Induces Pumpkin-Spiced Fever Dreams

Hugh Merwin, an editor at Grub Street, bought a 63-ounce jug of pumpkin spice syrup and put it in just about everything he ate for four days. As he tells NPR's Scott Simon, it did not go well.
NPR

Congress Uses Recent Issues To Attack NFL's Tax Exempt Status

Domestic violence and child abuse allegations against NFL stars have put the country's most-watched sports league in the congressional spotlight.
WAMU 88.5

Cellphones In Class Are No Problem In One Maryland School District

An Eastern Shore school district is allowing teachers to treat students' cellphones, tables and laptops as a resource rather than a nuisance.

Leave a Comment

Help keep the conversation civil. Please refer to our Terms of Use and Code of Conduct before posting your comments.