: News

Charm Card Meets SmartTrip

Play associated audio

By Patrick Madden

The Maryland Transit Administration is rolling out a new electronic fare card for use on the state's bus, subway, and light-rail systems.

It's called the CharmCard. It works just like Metro's SmarTrip cards and in fact the two can be used interchangeably. CharmCards will work at Metro stations, and SmarTrip cards will work on Baltimore's bus and light rail.

MTA spokeswoman Terry Owens says it will make commuting easier by integrating the region's transit systems.

The one holdout, though, is MARC trains and commuter buses. The project has been in the works for more than a decade and it cost Maryland more than $80 million to develop the card.

The CharmCard is available at select CVS and Giant stores. The card costs $10 and riders get a pre-loaded credit of $7.50.


From Trembling Teacher To Seasoned Mentor: How Tim Gunn Made It Work

Gunn, the mentor to young designers on Project Runway, has been a teacher and educator for decades. But he spent his childhood "absolutely hating, hating, hating, hating school," he says.

Native American Tribe Bets On Olive Oil

Once impoverished, California's Yocha Dehe tribe found success with a casino complex. Now the tribe is using its newfound wealth to grow, bottle and sell premium olive oil.

Osceola At The 50-Yard Line

The Seminole Tribe of Florida works with Florida State University to ensure it that its football team accurately presents Seminole traditions and imagery.

Payoffs For Prediction: Could Markets Help Identify Terrorism Risk?

In a terror prediction market, people would bet real money on the likelihood of attacks. NPR's Scott Simon speaks with Stephen Carter about whether such a market could predict — and deter — attacks.

Leave a Comment

Help keep the conversation civil. Please refer to our Terms of Use and Code of Conduct before posting your comments.