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Beach Replenishment Starts In Ocean City

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By Bryan Russo

Officials in Ocean City Maryland will begin pumping tons of sand on its beach today as part of Beach Replenishment: a program funded through a partnership with the town, the state of Maryland and the Federal Government.

One million cubic yards of sand will be pumped on to the beaches over the course of the next two months, one block at a time, from the Delaware Line all the way to 15th street and the Boardwalk in Ocean City.

It's projected to cost $9 million to fully repair the dune system that was left ravaged by a storm last November and to complete the every four year planned replenishment. City engineer Terry McGean says this year's project is a huge undertaking.

"To give you a sense of scale for a million cubic yards of sand, a dump truck holds about 20 cubic yards of sand, so that's 50,000 dump trucks of sand," says McGean.

Beach Replenishment dates back to 1986 when Hurricane Gloria destroyed virtually the entire Boardwalk.Since then, the US Army Corps of Engineers estimates that more than $256 million dollars worth of property has been saved by Ocean City's natural levee.


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