Northern Virginians Worried About Impending Army Job Moves | WAMU 88.5 - American University Radio

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Northern Virginians Worried About Impending Army Job Moves

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By David Schultz

Next year, the Army will move thousands of jobs to a site in Northern Virginia far away from bus or Metro lines.

And local residents are becoming increasingly worried about what this will do to traffic.

More than 200 people attended a town hall meeting here in Alexandria to voice their concerns about the Armys Base Realignment and Closure or BRAC process.

One of them was Terry Kester, who lives in southwest Alexandria near the site where 6,000 new jobs will be located.

Kester says traffic in this area is bad now, "and to add cars in any way to this situation is absurd, is an insult to an intelligence and its also environmentally hazardous."

The Army, meanwhile, is struggling to find solutions.

Dorothy Robyn, with the Defense Secretary's office, says the Army has never had to deal with problems from a community that gained jobs through BRAC.

Normally, for us, BRAC is dealing with communities that are devastated by having shut down a military installation," she says. "This is the opposite problem."

The Army is looking into providing shuttles from the nearest Metro station.

But it can't delay the process to move jobs beyond September of next year, because BRAC is Congressionally mandated.

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