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Moran Says Army Erred In Choosing BRAC Site

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By David Schultz

More than 200 Northern Virginians attended a town hall meeting to voice their concerns about BRAC the Armys Base Realignment and Closure process - and the traffic congestion that may come with it.

Steven Lally lives in Alexandria near the site where 6,000 new Army jobs will be coming next year - a site miles away from the nearest Metro station.

"It was ludicrous to put the building where it is not accessible to railroad," he says.

This town hall was held by Northern Virginia Congressman Jim Moran, a vociferous opponent of the BRAC moves.

Moran says the site in Alexandria was chosen because Army officials thought it would cost less than more Metro-accessible alternatives.

"It has subsequently become apparent," Moran says, "that one of the reasons there was a substantial difference in price is that the transportation plan was inadequate."

Moran says the cost of dealing with transportation at the Alexandria site now far exceeds what it would've cost to locate the jobs closer to Metro.

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