Gray Beats Fenty; Residents Not Surprised But Uncertain What Will Change | WAMU 88.5 - American University Radio

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Gray Beats Fenty; Residents Not Surprised But Uncertain What Will Change

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By Jonathan Wilson

People in the District of Columbia have voted incumbent mayor Adrian Fenty out of office. Fenty was defeated in yesterday's primary by city council chair Vincent Gray.

Few residents are surprised with the result, but not everyone agrees whether it's the change the city needs.

In the final count Gray overcame Fenty 53 percent to 46 percent, a convincing victory.

David Duarte, who was up early this morning grabbing a newspaper right across from Fenty's campaign headquarters on Georgia Avenue, says he was hoping Gray would win even though Fenty did some good things for the city.

"I think Mr. Fenty has got to learn some personnel skills on how to deal with people, because otherwise he did a decent job," says Duarte.

Lynette Meyers is an unemployed single mom, who says she voted not for Fenty or Gray, but Leo Alexander, because she doesn't think either mainstream candidate has a good plan for the city's unemployment problem.

"Gray and Fenty are neck and neck, they just look different, that's all," says Meyers.

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