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Fenty And Gray Prepare For Transition

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By Patrick Madden

There will be a new mayor of Washington, D.C. Adrian Fenty lost his re-election bid to Vincent Gray and both men are now preparing for the transition of power.

One of Gray's first priorities, he says, will be reaching out to the more than 50,000 voters who supported Mayor Fenty in this year's hard-fought and at times divisive campaign.

"Again I am going to work hard to try and earn the confidence of those who may not have voted for me," Gray says. "I know what we share in common: we both love this city."

Gray shied away from answering the question on everyone's mind -- whether he'll keep schools chancellor Michelle Rhee -- but he says he placed a call to her.

The Democratic nominee says any personnel decisions will have to wait until after the general election in November. Meanwhile at Fenty's campaign headquarters earlier Wednesday, the mayor pledged to help make a smooth transition of power.

He also talked about what he thought went wrong with his campaign.

"We made a lot of tough political decision - a lot of those political decisions cost us political popularity," says Fenty.

Fenty ruled out running as a Republican or independent and says he will probably never hold political office in D.C. again.


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