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Smithsonian Launches Jewelry Line

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One of the Smithsonian-inspired pieces will be based on the Hope Diamond.
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One of the Smithsonian-inspired pieces will be based on the Hope Diamond.

By Jonathan Wilson

For the first time in its history, the Smithsonian will take in revenue by lending its name to a jewelry line. The products go on sale this week on the television shopping network QVC.

The rings, necklaces, earrings and pendants are "inspired by" the National Gem Collection at the National Museum of Natural History in D.C. QVC created the jewelry line from gemstones, sterling silver and 14-karat gold.

QVC says the jewelry will debut Tuesday evening during a special two-hour program featuring interviews with a Smithsonian gemologist and a museum curator. The jewelry is priced from $65 to $950.

Terms of the Smithsonian's multiyear licensing agreement with QVC haven't been disclosed. But officials have said the museum complex will receive royalties based on sales.

Another jewelry set in December will include a piece based on the 45.5-carat Hope Diamond.

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