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National Black Family Reunion Celebrates 25th Year On The Mall

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By Jessica Jordan

Nearly 250,000 people gathered on the national mall for the 25th anniversary National Black Family Reunion Celebration.

The festival promotes African American families, offering entertainment, educational seminars, and free services, like dental exams.

Barbara Shaw is president for the National Council of Negro Women, the group that organizes the event every year.

She says this years celebration has been a success in reaching families nationwide.

"It's all the east coast that's here and we have a large section of women from Mississippi and Alabama," she says. "The black family reunion is a reunion for friends and family across the country."

Event key speakers like Joshua Dubois of the White House Office of Faith-Based and Neighborhood Partnerships also took the stage.

"I brought greetings from President Obama and really reflected on the central importance of families in our country," Dubois says. "No matter what policies and programs we advance, no matter what government and business does, it comes back to how strong our families are."

The event is funded through council proceeds.

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