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Muslim Celebration Not Deterred By 9/11 Loss

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By Ginger Moored

Muslim Family Day will be held tomorrow at Six Flags in Bowie, Maryland. Among the roller coasters will be Hallal food and space for prayer. Its founder was killed in the September 11th attacks, but the celebration is still going strong.

Tariq Amanullah founded Muslim Family Day in 2000 to celebrate the end of Ramadan. But, he died a year later in the World Trade Center.

The event didn't start up again until 2004 but last year it attracted 50,000 people nationwide. And Naeem Baig of the Islamic Circle of North America, which organizes the event, says talks of Quran-burning shouldn't keep anyone from coming this year.

"The best answer to all of this rhetoric against Islam and Muslims is that we’re proud of our faith, we’re proud of our country, and we respect the rights of each and every citizen of the country," Baig says.

Baig says one way to do this is to come to Muslim Family Day.

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