25th Anniversary Black Family Reunion Celebration Draws Hundreds | WAMU 88.5 - American University Radio

: News

25th Anniversary Black Family Reunion Celebration Draws Hundreds

Play associated audio

By Jessica Jordan

Cultural events and entertainment mark the 25th anniversary Black Family Reunion Celebration. The festival, hosted by the National Council of Negro Women, began today despite the loss of one of its most ardent supporters.

Long-time civil rights activist Dr. Dorothy Height never missed this one-day mega festival. She led the council for 40 years as president. In April 2010, she passed away. We spoke to event producer Shiba Haley about the challenges of planning the reunion without Height.

"This year we weren't sure what we were going to do after losing Dr. Height. We didn't have all the time that we normally have. It usually takes about six months so we really did months of work in six weeks," Haley says.

And how is the festival different this year?

"The biggest difference is not physically having her here because she didn't miss it she stayed from the beginning to the end to the last concerts she kept us motivated. She would come and stay there and was always so positive," Haley says.

The festival attracts nearly 250,000 people every year.

NPR

No Small Feat: The NBA's Shortest Player Never Gave Up

At 5 foot 3, Muggsy Bogues holds the record as shortest player in NBA history. Criticism of his height started on the basketball courts of the Baltimore projects, and continued well into his career.
NPR

Tracing A Gin-Soaked Trail In London

Around the world, new gin distilleries are popping up like mushrooms after a rain. NPR traces the boom to its historic roots in London, which once had 250 distilleries within the city limits alone.
NPR

Ranting And Throwing Papers: An Angry Candidate Runs For Congress

State Rep. Mike Bost's rants on the Illinois House floor are the stuff viral dreams are made of. Bost says he has good reason to be upset, and wants voters to share his anger.
NPR

Israel's Solar-Powered 'Trees': For Smartphones And Community

The man-made trees are designed to create a public space where people can gather and re-charge a battery — their own and their smartphone's.

Leave a Comment

Help keep the conversation civil. Please refer to our Terms of Use and Code of Conduct before posting your comments.