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BALTIMORE (AP) — Authorities in two states are trying to stop an abortion doctor with a notorious reputation from practicing medicine. Dr. Steven Brigham is accused of using a novel scheme to take advantage of disparities in state abortion laws.

COLLEGE PARK, Md. (AP) — Authorities in Prince George's County and at the University of Maryland are increasing patrols following armed robberies near the campus. County police say they have recorded five robberies in the area in the past three weeks, prompting police to step up patrols and urge students to be alert.

WASHINGTON (AP) — The EPA says its new permit for the Blue Plains sewage plant requires one of the Chesapeake Bay's biggest polluters to nearly halve its nitrogen output. The plant serves Washington, suburban Maryland and northern Virginia and accounts for more than 3 percent of the nitrogen in the bay, where it fuels oxygen-robbing algae blooms.

OCEAN CITY, Md. (AP) — The Ocean City Council has approved a bill to sell $18.1 million in bonds. The bonds will pay for renovations to the convention center and public works projects.


ABC Celebrates 50th Anniversary Of 'A Charlie Brown Christmas'

ABC will air "It's Your 50th Christmas Charlie Brown" Monday night. On the classic Christmas cartoon's golden anniversary, NPR explores what makes this ageless special endure.

L.A.'s Top Restaurant Charts New Waters In Sustainable Seafood

Providence is widely considered the finest restaurant in Los Angeles. Its award-winning chef, Michael Cimarusti, is piloting Dock to Dish, a program that hooks chefs up directly with local fishermen.

Top Paper's Endorsement Doesn't Always Equal Success In New Hampshire

New Jersey Gov. Chris Christie nabbed the backing of the New Hampshire Union Leader this weekend, citing his executive and national security experience. But that doesn't mean he's guaranteed a win.

Big Data Predicts Centuries Of Harm If Climate Warming Goes Unchecked

It took about 30 teams of scientists worldwide, using supercomputers to churn through mountains of data, to see patterns aligning of what will happen decades and centuries from now.

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