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Local Muslim Community Speaks; Quran Burning Will Fuel Extremists

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By Jessica Jordan

The Ahmadiyya Muslim community is speaking out against plans by a church in Florida to burn the Quran on September 11th. The group held its first interfaith dialogue in Silver Spring last night.

The national vice president of the Ahmadiyya Muslim community, Imam Naseem spoke to a packed house at the civic building about the dangers of burning the Quran, saying the act could be ammo for Muslim extremists.

"Those who are the enemies of peace, those who are the enemies of the United States of America, are going to use this to recruit suicide bombers," says Naseem.

That sentiment was echoed by Anser Mohammed, president of the Potomac and Frederick chapters of the Ahmadiyya muslim community, who calls the church's plan to burn the holy scriptures, ignorant.

"For a christian to call a book evil without having any detailed allegations to what his accusations are based on, we don't think that's fair, its really stirring more animosity, hatred and ignorance," says Mohammed.

The dialogue is the first of several that the national Muslim community will hold across the U.S. this week.

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