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Debate Over Religious Displays At Loudoun Courthouse Could Continue

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By Jonathan Wilson

In Virginia, Loudoun County Supervisors have voted to continue allowing religious holiday displays at the county courthouse, putting an end to a months long debate.

But some say the controversy could ignite again this holiday season.

Barry Lynn, executive director of the Americans United for the Separation of Church and State, says he's disappointed with the 8-1 vote in favor of the displays.

He says there's plenty of room for religious displays on private property that everyone can see.

"We don't need to find space for everyone's display, in every piece of public property," says Lynn.

Lynn says his group won't rule out legal challenges to Loudoun's policy, but will wait and see what transpires this holiday season.

Holiday displays at the square have been a tradition for decades.

Leesburg Supervisor Kelly Burk voted with the majority, she says she was concerned by how angry the debate sometimes got in recent months, but she feels good that the displays will be allowed to continue.

"I truly believe that it's either all or none, and there's nothing wrong with making sure that everyone's included," says Burk.

There are ten designated spots for displays at the courthouse. Supervisors say the spots are reserved on a first come, first serve, basis.

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