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    RICHMOND, Va. (AP) Virginia has submitted to the federal government its draft plan to restore the Chesapeake Bay, estimating that agriculture alone could face costs totaling $800 million to comply. State officials have concerns about the costs, saying it's being developed despite the bad economy.

    RICHMOND, Va. (AP) Gov. McDonnell wants nearly $500 million from selling Virginia's state-owned liquor stores to provide loans and grants for local highway congestion relief projects. He calls for up to 1,000 licenses for private retail stores, about three times the current number of stores.

    RICHMOND, Va. (AP) The state Department of Corrections says the only woman on the state's death row has declined to choose the method of her scheduled September 23rd execution. Forty-year-old Teresa Lewis of Pittsylvania County would be the first woman executed in Virginia in nearly 100 years and the first in the U.S. since 2005.

    LEESBURG, Va. (AP) The Board of Supervisors in Loudoun County has voted to continue a policy that allows people to erect religious and other displays on the grounds of the county courthouse. A county committee had recommended banning such displays because they feared the process would become unwieldy.

    (Copyright 2010 by The Associated Press. All Rights Reserved.)

    NPR

    How Dorothea Lange Taught Us To See Hunger And Humanity

    Perhaps no one did more to show us the human toll of the Great Depression than Lange, who was born on this day in 1895. Her photos of farm workers and others have become iconic of the era.
    NPR

    How Dorothea Lange Taught Us To See Hunger And Humanity

    Perhaps no one did more to show us the human toll of the Great Depression than Lange, who was born on this day in 1895. Her photos of farm workers and others have become iconic of the era.
    NPR

    Test Of '1 Person, 1 Vote' Heads To The Supreme Court

    Analysts have noted that dividing districts based on eligible voters rather than total population would tend to shift representative power to localities with fewer children and fewer immigrants.
    NPR

    One Man's Mission To Keep AOL's Legacy Alive

    In the wake of Verizon buying AOL, one man wants to make sure that the history of the once-dominant Internet service provider stays alive. Jason Scott wants you to send him all of your AOL CD-ROMs.

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